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While reading this question (Controlling 500 LEDs with PWM), I noticed that none of the answers addressed a design issue of LED brightness variability in a batch, factor that I thought could impact the OP's design.

I added this answer to highlight the issue that I thought was relevant, and right away I got a comment complaining that my answer brought a valid point but didn't answer the question.

My meta-question is: Are answers like mine valid for the site and appreciated by the users of EE.SE?

In other words, Can I post answers that address side issues that are relevant to the question at hand, but have not been answered properly by others, but doesn't answer the question completely?

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    \$\begingroup\$ In your case I would have added this as a comment to the answer you think addresses the question itself. \$\endgroup\$ – amadeus Dec 12 '13 at 13:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Gotcha! Good idea. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – Ricardo Dec 12 '13 at 13:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's hard to pick one answer as all have been really helpful. Once more, thanks for the guidance. \$\endgroup\$ – Ricardo Dec 12 '13 at 23:33
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I second @clabacchio and it is a normal process used. Some comments are very long, and relevant to the question, as both a partial answer, or a significant topic of another answer. You can see that done fairly often in questions. An answer doesn't always have to specifically answer the question, if another answer has already properly addressed it. You not only provide a valid issue with having multiple leds, but also provide ways of fixing said issue, something that could not be done without significantly changing someone else's answer or in comments.

Your specific one though, does address something the other answers did not, with the most upvoted answers are basically "use project x" and "use library y". The only fault was really that it's a four year old question. Some questions just don't merit being dredged up.

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I'd say that, if you have significant content that can't fit in a comment, you can post it as an answer. You can refer to another answer that you think appropriate to complete your point.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ An important point I would add to this, is to specify at the start of your answer that it is complementary. Anyone reading it then knows that it is not meant to be a standalone answer, and can vote accordingly. (What Olin said.) \$\endgroup\$ – JYelton Feb 20 '14 at 3:22
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It is perfectly fine to give additional information relevant to the question in a answer, even if it does not directly answer the question. However, others may see that it doesn't answer the question and downvote.

What you should do is start a answer like that with something like "This doesn't directly answer the question, but I think it's important to point out ...". that way people will see that you aren't pretending to answer the question and may actually upvote if the additional information is useful.

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