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This question is meant to be a glossary of abbreviations used in electrical engineering.

Some abbreviations are very common and universal, and are therefore acceptable to use on this site. Others are quite localized or pet abbreviations used by individuals without a wide following, so are not acceptable on this site. One purpose of this question is to list all abbreviations so that others have a chance to decode them if encountered, but thru voting also show which ones are acceptable to use in a wide international context or not.

So here are some rules to make this question work:

  1. Each answer must only be for ONE abbreviation.

  2. This will be community wiki, so only ONE answer for each abbreviation. If you want to expand on a description, edit the existing answer for that abbreviation.

  3. This is going to get long, so consistant formatting will help. For each answer (abbreviation), start with just the abbreviation within HTML "h1" and "/h1" tags on a line by itself.

  4. Upvote answers for abbreviations you think would be acceptable to use in a post on this site without any expansion or explanation.

  5. Downvote abbreviations (answers) you think should not be used "bare" on this site. This will be community-wiki, so nobody will loose reputation as a result. In this special case, you are voting on the universality of the abbreviation, not on the quality of the writeup. If you don't like the write up, fix it instead.


INDEX

A - A(2) AC(7) ADC(15) ALU(3) AM(7) ASCII(12) ASIC(6) ASK(1) AWG(7)

B - BCD(5) BJT(16) BLDC(4) BNC(6) BPF(1) BW(3)

C - CAD(5) CAN(7) CC(1) CC-II(-1) CCCS(1) CCD(6) CMOS(16) CMRR(1) COG(0) CPLD(4) CPM(-1) CPU(7) CRO(-1)

D - DAC(15) DC(7) DEMUX(2) DFT(2) DIP(5) DLL(2) DMA(7) DRC(3) DSO(3) DSP(13) DTFT(0) DVD(-10) DVM/DMM(4)

E - ECL(4) EDA(6) EE(7) EEPROM(13) EMC(3) EMS(-7) EOS(0) EPROM(3) ESD(9)

F - F(2) FDNR(-3) FET(17) FFC(2) FFT(6) FIFO/LIFO(7) FM(7) FPGA(9) FSK(1) FSM(4)

G - GBW(5) GIC(-1) GND(16) GPIO(9) GPS(4)

H - H(2) HDTV(-11) HF(4) hFE(2) HPF(2) HVSP(-1) Hz(3)

I - i(-1) I/P(-7) I2S(1) IC(11) IF(4) IFT(1) IGBT(9) IGFET(0) ISP(4) I²C(13)

J - j(-1) JFET(10) JTAG(7)

K - KCL(6) KVL(6)

L - LCD(17) LED(19) LF(3) LPF(4) LSB, MSB(2) LUT(5) LVD(-1) LVDS(5) LVDT(0) LVS(-2)

M - MCU(6) MEMS(6) MIDI(4) MOSFET(17) MPU(-1) ms(2) MUX(6)

N - NEXT(-6) NPN(12) NTSC(0) NVM(0)

O - O/P(-7) OCXO(2) OLED(4) OP-AMP(8) OTA(3)

P - P-P(0) PAL (logic)(2) PAL (television)(0) PC(-1) PCB(17) PCBA(-5) PCM(4) PFM(-2) PIC(0) PID(9) PLL(9) PM(0) , duplicate(0) PNP(14) POR(3) PPM(-1) PSK(5) PUT(-1) PWM(24)

Q - QM(-6) QVGA(0)

R - RADAR(0) RAM(12) RF(5) RFID(6) RGB(4) RJ45(6) ROM(3) RTL (discrete logic)(2) RTL (Verilog)(2)

S - SAW(3) SCR(9) SD,SDHC(0) SDCC(-3) SMA(4) SMPS(9) SMT(5) SNR(5) SOC/SoC(5) SPI(13) SPICE(8) SRAM(6) SRPP(-2) STA(0)

T - TBH(-8) TCXO(2) THD(6) TRF(-1) TTL(10) TVS(4)

U - UART(12) UHF(4) UJT(0) UL(3) USART(4) USB(4)

V - V(2) VCA(1) VCC / VEE / VDD / VSS(14) VCCS(1) VCO(5) VCXO(3) VFD(3) VGA(-2) VHDL(7) VHF(5) VLSI(2) VNL,VFL(-1) VSWR(4)

W - W(2)

X - XO(1) XOR(3) XTAL(5)

Ω - Ω(0)

186 answers - Sun May 11 09:17:28 2014 (CET)

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i

I (or i): steady-state current

Sometimes i stands for instantaneous current.

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SRPP

The acronym's meaning is uncertain, but generally denotes a circuit with two triodes (tube or solid-state) connected such that the input triode's load is bootstrapped by the other triode, increasing the apparent impedance of the load seen by the input device.

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PC

Program counter

Often used in microcontrollers when programming in assembly language.

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Unfortunately, this could also be a Personal Computer or a Printed Circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – gbarry May 11 '14 at 6:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ 1+ Commonly used enough that I think it belongs here \$\endgroup\$ – user10256 May 14 '14 at 20:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ PC stands for many things but I'd argue Program Counter is the most useful one to have on this site. \$\endgroup\$ – Alex Shroyer May 15 '14 at 1:27
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P-P

Multiple meanings:

  • peak-to-peak, as in "the signal is 348V, p-p"
  • push-pull, a type of amplifier configuration with a pair of devices. One device acts as a current source, the other as a current sink.
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QVGA

Quarter Video Graphics Array, a 320 × 240 point graphics array (half each dimension of VGA, so a quarter the area or pixels) common in embedded systems that have less memory or processing power to drive a large display.

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RADAR

RAdio Detection And Ranging

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FDNR

Frequency Dependent Negative Resistor

(An active circuit consisting of two operational amplifiers; primary use in active filters)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Really!? This is getting ridiculous. Adding these kind of obscure abbreviations is getting absurd. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop May 10 '14 at 13:33
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GIC

Generalized Impedance Converter

(A very versatile active circuit consisting of two operational amplifiers; primarily used in active filters and harmonic oscillators)

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CC-II

Current Conveyor (second generation)

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PM (control systems)

Phase margin (a stability measure for systems with feedback)

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PM (modulation)

Short for "Phase Modulation"

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DDR

Double data rate.

(As in DDR RAM)

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IMD

Intermodulation Distortion. A type of signal error (distortion) where two or more signals mix in a nonlinear circuit, resulting in new frequency components.

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CRO

Cathode Ray Oscilloscope.

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P1dB

Short for Output power at 1dB compression point. It is typically used when referring to Amplifiers. It is defined as the output power level at which the actual gain achieved deviates from the small signal gain by 1 dB.
All active components have a linear dynamic range. This is the range over which the output power varies linearily with respect to the input power. As the output power increases to near its maximum capability, the device will begin to saturate. The point at which the saturation effects are 1 dB from linear, is defined as the 1 dB compression point.

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