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I'm a software engineer who works for a small unnamed company, however the firmware department has all quit together over a dispute about wages in the company(mainly because the marketing guys earn more). now I'm needing to write an EEPROM and I'm not sure if I'm allowed to ask on this site for tutorials and help in what certain things mean on the data sheet but like on SO these questions may not be allowed so I thought better ask here first before I post on the main site

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    \$\begingroup\$ Aside, if marketing is making more than engineering, it's time to GTFO. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Young Apr 9 '15 at 16:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ I recommend pre-screening your question in the EE.SE chat first. I also recommend contacting the technical support of the company that makes your EEPROMs. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Apr 9 '15 at 20:08
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This really depends on how you ask your questions.

If you ask

How do I design [insert large, complicated system here]?

then your question will probably be too broad. If the answer would look more like a chapter from a book, then it's probably off-topic.


If you ask

I am designing [insert large, complicated system here] and I am stuck on [specific thing]. What does this line from the datasheet mean?

then you're fine. Just make sure that your questions are small and self-contained.

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Seems OK to me, given that you keep the questions specific. Personally, I think you'd be better off in chat asking how to find a good consultant to get it done for you. I suppose that depends on how important it is that you get it right quickly, and what it will cost if you get it wrong.

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