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https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/175166/where-to-put-fuses-with-a-new-relay-added-to-a-car

And maybe suggestions on how I can improve it?


I wanted to get a more complete answer that answers my question of: Where do I put the fuse in automotive circuitry?

I am also asking clarification on background knowledge that may or may not affect this question. e.g. electricity flow, electron flow, proton flow, etc.

I mention the headlight circuit, but I am trying not to limit the question to just the headlight circuit. This is more about the automotive system in general and how fuses work and how/why electricity flow directions affect the way the fuses work or not in whatever component circuitry in the automotive system.

I am sure much of the background knowledge stuff applies to more than just the automotive, but I am unsure of exactly what and how so I ask this question for clarification.

References:
How the Current Flows in a Car?
answer mentioning different flow types: https://electronics.stackexchange.com/a/95049/66759

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why did you remove Matt's edits? That was more reasonably scoped and you've just changed it back to something too broad. \$\endgroup\$
    – PeterJ
    Jun 12 '15 at 14:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @PeterJ As mentioned in my re-edit, it takes away the part of the question that matters the most to me. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ What is the reason for the down-vote in this case? is this question not appropriate or something? \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:07
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The question went through quite a few quick revisions so there were probably a few different close votes in there (I voted as a duplicate on one revision). But the final reason of "too broad" probably sums it up well, to cover parts of your question:

I understand there are different types of electric current and there is electron and proton current or flow. Are there anymore?

Your understanding has several flaws (for example as per comments protons don't come into it) so just covering that basic theory on electricity to explain and clear it all up would need a fairly lengthy answer in itself. Then the following:

Which direction do they all flow and how do each of these affect the component/device it's connected to?

Asking how it affects all components and devices is really asking how to do circuit analysis of just about anything and combined with the first constitutes probably most of an introductory level book about electronics.

To improve the question you'll really have to narrow it down, maybe if you are interested in an more in-depth knowledge of electricity and electronics do some further reading because I gather where to place the fuse on headlights is just a hypothetical question? Although if it really is a practical question and you're trying to wire something in particular it'd be best to just describe what you're really trying to do.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Thank you, this is most helpful. When i say "how it affects all components" i guess i meant to say "what bad effects will it have on components?" not sure if thats much better though. I meant it to be more general, rather than to be so specific as to require in-depth circuit analysis. but my understanding sucks too much to know any better. i am wanting to do something practical at some point, more than just one thing, so i am trying to understand the topic of fuse location in general car circuits so i can apply that knowledge to all systems i would eventually tinker in. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:13
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To me, the biggest problem with that question was there were too many bad assumptions that had to be dealt with before answering the actual question. Since you're trying, I've edited the question to something answerable. Make sure the spirit of the question is still correct.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is what I came to say. The premise of the question has problems, so it's extremely hard to give it a good answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Greg d'Eon
    Jun 12 '15 at 14:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ i understand what you were trying to do. but it took away from what i really wanted to know... i am NOW understanding that there are too many bad assumptions and am working them out lol \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ What DO you really want to know? And don't even list that electron and proton current nonsense. \$\endgroup\$
    – Matt Young
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ Basically?... Its that "nonsense"... haha. its that stuff thats confusing me \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 12 '15 at 15:26
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I only saw this question just now and haven't gone back to look at the history. However, two problems immediately struck me:

  1. Too many bad assumptions.

  2. Too many different questions.

1 makes it difficult to write a simple answer, so it's easier just to close. It's a bit like trying to answer "Since tomatoes only grow on rocks, why are they always purple?".

2 makes it difficult to answer since you either have to answer a lot of questions or it's not clear what the question really is. These questions are too broad in scope, which is one of the close reasons here.

You may have some misconceptions and a bunch of questions, but this site works best when you don't first try to lecture, and then only ask one question at a time. If there are misconceptions behind that, they will probably be explained. That will probably help clarify other questions. If there are still other questions after that, ask them one at a time, and make sure your new questions take into account things you've learned from previous questions.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ i think thats a pretty gross overstatement by equating me asking for confirmation on such and such potential effects on such and such (especially when I say i am a newbie) vs "such and such only grow on such and such". Either way, isn't there a potential for a good answer to say "No, because these assumptions are incorrect and this is what actually happens" or is that just too broad and too lengthy to write any kind of decent answer to? \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 15 '15 at 2:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is it wrong for me to assume that I can start with a question and continue working at it until it becomes a good question? The problem is, I do not know what I do not know, and that makes getting started on researching topics very difficult. I am trying to get some guidance on learning and understanding some topics that I am just discovering and am having a hard time finding information and understanding it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Zero
    Jun 15 '15 at 2:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Zero: You are right, "No, because these assumptions are incorrect ..." can be too lengthy and a lot more trouble than simply answering a question. Start by asking ONE question. That makes it easier to dispell bad assumptions in the process of answering. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 15 '15 at 11:01

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