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Could I ask a question on the Stack Exchange 'electrical engineering' site about designing and creating materials associated with metamorphosis (for example, metamaterials, etc.)?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Ask this on their own meta site, or simply ask the actual question. \$\endgroup\$ – user3364 Jun 25 '11 at 18:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ In case this is still an issue, I'd concur with Kortuk that Physics is probably a good place ask such questions. \$\endgroup\$ – David Z Jul 11 '11 at 22:41
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My wife is a researcher in the realm of metamaterials. She is also an electrical engineer. Every other person in her lab is a physicist. Her adviser is in the EE department, but he has every degree in physics.

My point here is relatively simple, we do not have a strong enough photonics group to easily handle detailed questions in regard to metamaterials. Physics SE is almost guaranteed to have more photonics and optics members, but I am not the one to give that guarantee, please take a shot at asking on their SE.

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As an electrical engineer, I have no idea what you mean by metamaterials. Practically speaking, either a material is a material, or it isn't, and most engineers are very practical about such things. Are you talking about phase change materials that go from solid, liquid, gas, plasma, etc. and transform into energy (the most common "non material" thing electronic engineers deal with)?

In other words, I expect you'll have to describe your inquiry a little more before we can help you understand if the electrical engineering Stack Exchange site can help you.

Please note that there is also a physics Stack Exchange site, and a mathematics Stack Exchange site.

Also, this question might be better fielded on the meta site for Electrical Engineering, rather than the general meta here.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ this site should help- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamaterials \$\endgroup\$ – user784347 Jun 25 '11 at 18:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ @user Personally my bar is: If you can buy it as a manufactured component from a major distributor or manufacturer, then it's within the realm of ee. If it's still in the research phases, you would probably be better off at physics, or possibly another science/math site depending on the exact nature of your question. \$\endgroup\$ – Adam Davis Jun 25 '11 at 18:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ there are still a number of things like MEMS research that are very heavily EE. \$\endgroup\$ – Kortuk Jun 27 '11 at 10:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Kortuk Sure, but for people who are unsure, the above bar is not a bad place to start. \$\endgroup\$ – Adam Davis Jun 27 '11 at 15:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ that is a good point. \$\endgroup\$ – Kortuk Jun 28 '11 at 3:15

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