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How is someone perceived asking more questions than answering them?

As the website is mixed between experts and beginners, there is obviously going to be an imbalance. But someone like myself still learning to ask more questions than answers, it generally looked down on? I find on StackExchange the bar is set high (which is good) but it limits you to only answering questions you really know. Do you feel as long as the questions are quality it does not matter or more effort should be made to answer (even if others do it better), or wait and learn and give back to the community later?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The only issue here is someone asking a lot of questions without never marking any answer as accepted, even though they got good answers. As long as you do that every time you get an answer which solves the problem (which is of course not always the case), you can ask as much as you like. \$\endgroup\$ – Lundin May 2 '18 at 15:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ The site is pretty good however found out there are some experts that wants to proof they are experts all of the time. For a beginner it is not always possible to formulate a question to expert standards. There must be more respect to this instead downvoting or complaining it is wrong, or saying it is wrong (actually bad) without nice arguments to help. Especially when there is allot of effort used to formulating the question the best you can. For example, the rude way: "schematic is missing" or the gentle way: "Can you add a schematic so we can see what you are doing?" helpful not complaining \$\endgroup\$ – Codebeat May 3 '18 at 0:31
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Cod: No, coddling those who don't bother to learn the rules and norms of the site before blurting out their question is a bad idea. This site isn't for everyone. We have to require some level of knowledge to make answers possible. Electrical engineers communicate circuits with schematics. That's how it's done. Anyone that posts here should know that, either from minimum familiarity with electronics or from due diligence learning site norms before posting. If someone can't or won't do that, then we'd rather not have them. They'll just noise up the site and dissipate volunteer energy. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop May 3 '18 at 12:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop ; The example was just an understandable example, to keep it simple. I am not talking about specific cases which is impossible to give a simple example everyone understand. Actually, I am talking about the form of applying arguments only, it must be helpful, to be able to learn, not a judgement or punishment. \$\endgroup\$ – Codebeat May 3 '18 at 15:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Cod: But everyone is judged by what they write. In fact, there's a voting system to formalize it. And no, when people are lazy and dump crap here, we don't want to "help" them. That will only encourage them. You seem to want a utopian world where nobody can do any wrong, even when due to laziness or irresponsibility. Fortunately, this site is not such a place. Askers should and do have responsibilities. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop May 3 '18 at 16:01
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    \$\begingroup\$ @OlinLathrop : Abusing the voting system is quite easy and sometimes voting is a matter of taste. Frequently I spot a downvoted question and wonder why. Sometimes I see a limited question and upvoted and wonder why. Askers should and do have responsibilities, true, but also the "jury", don't hit that down button because you had a bad hairday. \$\endgroup\$ – Codebeat May 3 '18 at 16:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Cod: Downvoting crap is not only not abusing the voting system, but the site relies on it. \$\endgroup\$ – Olin Lathrop May 14 '18 at 11:38
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This site is ultimately driven by good questions getting asked. Asking good questions helps the site. It doesn't matter whether you also answer questions or not.

The important point is that anything you post, whether questions or answer, be of high quality. I just looked at your question history, and its positive but spotty. Out of 19 questions, 4 have been closed. Two have a negative score, 8 have 0 score, and 9 have a positive score. You should be examining what you did right and wrong in each case, and strive to improve the quality of your questions going forward.

Don't worry about the total number of questions, or the mix of questions versus answers.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think this also answers the question "Is this site for everyone, really?" or something like that I've seen around here more than one time. \$\endgroup\$ – Daniel Tork May 4 '18 at 17:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm a beginner in electronics and an expert in robotics. I ask questions in electronics stack exchange hoping for valuable answers. I also answer to questions in robotics in other places. I don't think a "balance" inside each community would be wise. \$\endgroup\$ – Victor Lamoine May 6 '18 at 17:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Olin Lathrop: What is a "good" question or a "high-quality" question? May be, everybody has his own definition. To me, a "good" question contains a clear and complete description of the problem - so that some of us are able to give an answer without asking back: "what do you mean with...", "what is the meaning of the symbol "x"", "where now is the problem..."....... \$\endgroup\$ – LvW May 11 '18 at 14:35
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How is someone perceived asking more questions than answering them?

That's perfectly fine. It's good that you want to learn. No one is stopping you from asking as many questions as you want (except perhaps, StackExchange's rule on how many questions you may ask if you repeatedly ask bad questions). That's the freedom of this website. We don't discriminate against your nature of curiosity as long as you know proper research techniques.

Do you feel as long as the questions are quality it does not matter or more effort should be made to answer (even if others do it better), or wait and learn and give back to the community later?

Ask right away. When you ask good questions, you're helping other people understand your question and they will learn something as well. You're also saving the trouble of someone asking the question. You're concerned about if someone needs more details based on the question you asked? Don't worry about that. If they need more explanation, they would refer to your question and then they will ask for something more specific or clarification.

Ultimately, you're contributing to the community when you ask questions because you're helping us build a good database of questions. I always make an analogy of this website in that if a global thermonuclear war occurred on our planet and the only surviving data center was StackExchange (assuming that textbooks were also destroyed), you would be helping the surviving civilization of the nuclear fallout to access our information on here so that they can help rebuild humanity.

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    \$\begingroup\$ +1, but I think this really warrants the hint that of course, the more precisely statetd, the more comprehensive yet compressed / concise the problem is described, the better the chances are someone will look at your question and go "oh! I know the answer to that!". But it's impossible to know right from the start what's important, in many cases, so, describe any problem as well as you can, and let the community work its magic. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Apr 28 '18 at 12:44
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But someone like myself still learning to ask more questions than answers, it generally looked down on?

If you ask high quality questions,
if you do preliminary research,
if you clarify and provide context when somebody needs clarification,
if you participate in the discussion in comments

...then nobody will or should look down on you because you post more questions than answers.

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