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Background:

I just a had a question I asked about current to ground marked as duplicate of another question I asked a couple of years ago about the polarity of potentials marked as duplicate. While I certainly see the questions are related, they are not asking about the same phenomena, so how could they be duplicate? Related, for sure, but duplicate - hardly.

In the one question, I asked about where the current flowed in a circuit (positive terminal to ground, or positive terminal to negative terminal, when a ground is present in the circuit and is not the negative terminal). In the other question, I asked about how to measure voltages at various points in a circuit (also with a ground present in the circuit that is not the negative terminal of the battery).

Thankfully, it wasn't marked duplicate before some helpful folks actually answered the question or I would still be in the dark about my question. Surely, this isn't the intent of the duplicate question process.

I know it may sound like I'm complaining, but really, I'm hoping to understand why the quick closure of what seemed to be a productive Q&A.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I didn't vote to close, but it really looks like the same question to me. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 27 at 19:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ How so? One is about current the other is about voltage... \$\endgroup\$
    – decuser
    Aug 27 at 21:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ They probably were considered duplicate because both questions seem to result from the same misunderstanding of what ground is. Whether it's mostly about current or voltage isn't very relevant. \$\endgroup\$
    – dim
    Aug 29 at 10:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @dim that makes sense. Too bad they didn't just point out the common misunderstanding. In the meantime, I've taken this to a discussion board to figure out the nuances of the misconception. I get the ground is reference now, but there are some lingering questions about current and potential differences that I need to get cleared up. \$\endgroup\$
    – decuser
    Aug 29 at 12:27

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